NASA's Airborne Remote Sensing Laboratory for Monitoring the World's Coral

In our previous post JoJo Burridge, '15, described the process of ocean acidifciation due to CO2 pollution. Since then NASA announced a beefed-up version of its COral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL) that will provide critical data and new models to analyze the status of coral reefs and to predict their future. CORAL acquires airborne spectral image data using the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) instrument. 

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Sensors and Emerging Tech Help Drought Ravaged California

Emerging water technologies are receiving increased attention in media coverage of the California drought. This small piece of good news could help Clarkson University’s Beacon Institute and other institutions that want to speed the pace of innovation in sensor tech, real-time monitoring, analytics and more. Read on for some examples.

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Back in the Day: Rubber Ducks as Remote Sensors

There were respected predecessors to the high-tech sensors and computer analytics Beacon Institute and others use to monitor river and ocean currents — such as thousands of rubber ducks, tracked all over the globe after being lost overboard in a shipping container in 1992.

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NASA's SMAP REmote Sensing Satellite Will Produce Global Maps of Soil Moisture

An orbiting observatory that measures the amount of water in the top 5 cm (2 inches) of soil everywhere on Earth’s surface will soon be placed in a polar orbit around Earth. It is called SMAP. SMAP stands for Soil Moisture Active and Passive. SMAP will produce global maps of soil moisture. Scientists will use these to help improve our understanding of how water and carbon (in its various forms) circulate.

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